prototypemmeh

Life, the Martial Challenges, and Everything.

Tag: Bellevue

Proving Grounds

I must say that my choice of tournaments thus far in 2015 has been a little more unusual compared to my standard resume.  While I have been to only two this year, they have both been Submission Only tournaments, and one of them a Round Robin format.

A year ago I competed in the Proving Grounds Qualifier II in Bellevue WA, and had a lot of fun.  I was looking forward to making my return to Washington, and to a bigger venue.  The drive down was great, quick border crossing, easy traffic, and no construction to delay things or re-route me.

Unfortunately, my first match started with my opponent trying a flying triangle.  I blocked it enough that his legs couldn’t lock up around me, but he still had a good collar grip.  We went down to the mat, and the referee ruled it as a slam and DQ’d me.  My opponent argued against the call, and managed to give the choice to my remaining four opponents.  Two of them took the easy win points, and two of them opted to let me on the mats with them.

I’m already three matches down at this point, with a score of 0 versus three of my opponents with a score of 3.  It would take everyone else going to a draw and me winning both matches in order to get a podium spot, but I only managed to get one win.  I will say that my back-take is superior to what I saw that day, the Cobrinha lockdown is an amazing tool to get the superior position and then work on the submission.  I pulled off a modified bow-and-arrow – essentially a very lazy lapel choke – that Coach Jordan showed me the night before.  My other match I managed to take the back, but not soon enough and it went to a draw.

Thus I finished with 4 points to my name; a win, a draw, and three losses that shouldn’t have happened.  My late rally wasn’t enough to get me on the podium, leaving me feel disappointed and a touch betrayed.

There is a lot more that I want to work on and become proficient at, but I may be competing in too many tournaments and thus not giving myself the chance to let the new techniques become muscle memory.  The priority now is taking the time to seal up the holes in my game.  I might start a big flow-chart to help keep me organized.  I’ve found that putting things on paper keeps it from getting too overwhelming.

–Kiyoshi “The Prototype”
Your #1 Canadian eh?
Respect the Technique, Triangle Army

The Proving Grounds

Last week I updated my goals, and mentioned that I was soon to compete internationally.  Now it may seem like I’m making a big deal about competing internationally, but I know how long it takes for me to adjust; I’d rather not pay a lot in registration and travel and accommodation just to be overwhelmed by too many things.

Proving Grounds Qualifier 2, hosted by KYS Promotions, held at Ring Sports United, is a round-robin submission-only tournament.  That format promises to match a competitor against everyone in the bracket, or the best of three if there are only two competitors in the bracket.  The submission only aspect encourages finishes and attempts until the very last second of each match.  In order to determine a bracket winner and runner-up, points are awarded at the end of each match: three points to the winner by submission and zero points to the submitted, or one point to each competitor if there is no submission finish.  Total points are tallied once everyone has faced each other, and the most points gives you the first and second places.

In a bracket of two people, you do a best of three scenario, and in the event of a tie (i.e., one win to each competitor and one draw) there is an unlimited time tie-breaker match.  This is what happened to me.

Brendan (or maybe it was Brandon, still waiting on the official results to be posted), my opponent, and I weighed in at 164.6lbs.  We were assigned to mat 1, which featured the kids divisions in Gi and No-Gi before we finally went.  Actually, we were the last Gi division to go, the adult No-Gi had already started multiple weight divisions.  As soon as we locked up, I realized he was a very proficient judoka, and decided to pull guard to put me in a position I’m comfortable with.  After minutes of battling in guard, he finally managed to break it and sit in side control.  A judoka has a different style of sitting in top side control, one I have quite learned to how to escape from.  In their position, they can easily attack a keylock submission using their leg to provide leverage.  And that is exactly what he did.

Round 1 winner: Brendan
Points: 3 to 0

Our second round I realized I had one option: wrestle him.  I shot in early for a single-leg and dragged him down, managing to push past his attempts to re-guard me and transition into side control.  Most of the match is a blur, I do remember getting my hooks and taking his back before he shucked me off and gained side control, whereupon I attempted to bridge out.  While that specific attempt failed, I wasn’t far from making it work.  Then our time was up, the match ended.

Round 2 winner: Draw
Points: 4 to 1

At this point I had seen a previous division finish with one draw and one win.  Apparently the third match is required if there has only been one victory.  So we shook hands again and battle once more.  I shot in again, transition to side control, took his back, he escaped into my guard and during his attempt to pass I slapped on a triangle and locked it up.  Normally I prefer to have my right leg to control their upper body behind their neck, but in this case it was my left leg.  Not quite as confident with myself, I didn’t want to risk a quick unlock to better position myself for a tighter triangle, so I fell back on the old trick of pulling their head down to further compress arteries and airways.  It worked, though I was a tiny bit disappointed in having to resort to that.

Round 3 winner: Kiyoshi
Points: 4 to 4 (tie)

This is where the tie breaker with unlimited time comes in.  I have seen teammates stuck in a 90-minute match, unable to secure a submission for the win, and I vowed not to be in those shoes.  It would be a fast and decisive finish.  And it was, but not for me.  I don’t know why I didn’t shoot in again, but Brendan managed a shoulder throw.  I have been on the receiving end of this throw before, and 5o% of the time I manage to take their back instead of being truly taken down.  In this particular case, I was close to securing the back, but he managed to pull me that last little bit and gain top side control and keylock me.

Round 4 winner: Brendan
Points: 7 to 4

1st place: Brendan
2nd place: Kiyoshi

We chatted after receiving our medals, about judo, wrestling, and being able to stop certain attempts.  I admitted that I had specific training on what to do if my shot was stuffed, which was what allowed me to take him down.  He admitted that he had barely trained his sprawls and had concentrated more on what to do when an opponent pulled guard.

Overall I am happy with my performance, and I have a few things I can tune up for my next tournament (which is at the end of the month in Penticton).  I am also very happy to have travelled across the border for this one, and I look forward to getting more experience and tournaments under my belt south of the border.  I also look forward to finding out if the promotion will post the videos of the matches anywhere, they had a dedicated video camera and operator at each match.

–Kiyoshi “The Prototype”
Your #1 Canadian eh?